July 14th 2018


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY By-elections a trial run for next federal election

SOCIAL MEDIA Facebook bans reflect a lack of impartiality

CANBERRA OBSERVED The gloves are on for by-election proxy bouts

FEDERAL POLITICS Federal ALP platform reads like a radical on a soapbox

ENVIRONMENT 'Climate change' news is fake news

BRITISH HISTORY Abolition of the Corn Laws paved the way for cheap food

LIFE ISSUES A world of competing sorrows: Ireland's abortion referendum

CULTURE The wee folk and their cousins, up and down the scale

WESTERN CIVILISATION Three great anniversaries of the West

FICTION Autumn Alexei's Story

MUSIC ABBA; Unstoppable, ubiquitous

CINEMA Jurassic World: Fallen kingdom

BOOK REVIEW Vision for the future, if we want to claim it

BOOK REVIEW Taking to task failed privilege

BOOK REVIEW Where Tolkien and St Thomas agree

LETTERS

FOREIGN AFFAIRS Beijing goes 'boo', Qantas gets in a flap

Books promotion page

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE CAR INDUSTRY?

Ian Porter, with cartoons by Mark Knight and John Spooner

$24.99


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Book description

The Australian car industry is almost 120 years old, and has become part of the nation’s industrial and social fabric. With protection from the federal government in the early years, and co‑investment more recently, the industry thrived, and dragged Australia out of the farm era and into the ranks of industrialised countries.

These days, the industry has provided a great return on the taxpayer investment; income tax paid by automotive workers repays the taxpayer three times over. But this was not good enough for prime minister Tony Abbott, or his austerity-minded treasurer, Joe Hockey. They decided to bully the carmakers into leaving so the government could save a few dollars.

What Happened to the Car Industry? tells this story more in sorrow than in anger. Accompanied by superb cartoons by Mark Knight and John Spooner, it is an indictment of political folly and industrial vandalism.

 

About the author

The first story Ian Porter wrote when he joined The Age in 1971 was about the car industry. The automotive sector has been the main theme in his journalism career, whether he was at The Age, The Advertiser, or The Australian Financial Review. He has reported from Europe, Japan, Korea, and China, and has also worked as a business editor, columnist, commentator, and motor-racing reporter.

John Spooner was a political cartoonist and illustrator with The Age newspaper in Melbourne from 1977 until this year. He has won four Walkley awards, five Stanleys, and the Graham Perkins Journalist of the Year Award (2003).

Mark Knight was appointed political cartoonist at The Australian Financial Review in 1984, before joining Melbourne’s The Herald in 1987 in the same role. In 1990, he became cartoonist for the newly merged Herald Sun and has since become that paper’s editorial cartoonist. He has won three Walkley awards, and in 2014 was named Cartoonist of the Year by the Museum of Australian Democracy.


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