July 29th 2017


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY The rise and rise of Old King Coal

EDITORIAL Behind Donald Trump's endorsement of Poland

CANBERRA OBSERVED Cory Bernardi claims strong flow to his ranks

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Liu Xiaobo's extraordinary courage remembered

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Why we must fight for freedom: Trump in Poland

HEALTH Gardasil(R) and the man upon the stair, Part II

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Death of caliph will hasten end of Islamic State

MUSIC What's in a tune: minor change makes a major difference

CINEMA Spider-Man: Homecoming: Reboot on a domestic scale

BOOK REVIEW Moves that may push our constitution over

BOOK REVIEW Exposing the transgender agenda

LETTERS

GENDER POLITICS Edmund Rice Education Australia proposes transgender sex-ed

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Bird on an Ethics Wire: Battles about Values in the Culture Wars

Margaret Somerville

$45.75


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McGill-Queen’s UP, Montreal, 2015
Hardcover: 358 pages
Price: AUD$45.75

 

Book description

Our physical ecosystem is not indestructible and we have obligations to hold it in trust for future generations. The same is true of our metaphysical ecosystem – the values, principles, attitudes, beliefs, and shared stories on which we have founded our society. In Bird on an Ethics Wire, Margaret Somerville explores the values needed to maintain a world that reasonable people would want to live in and pass on to their descendants.

Somerville addresses the conflicts between people who espouse “progressive” values and those who uphold “traditional” ones by casting her attention on the debates surrounding “birth” (abortion and reproductive technologies) and “death” (euthanasia) and shows how words are often used as weapons. She proposes that we should seek to experience amazement, wonder and awe to enrich our lives and help us to find meaning. Such experiences, Somerville believes, can change how we see the world and live our lives, and affect the decisions we make, especially regarding values and ethics. They can help us to cope with physical or existential suffering, and ultimately put us in touch with the sacred – in either its secular or religious form – which protects what we must not destroy.

Experiencing amazement, wonder, and awe, Somerville concludes, can also generate hope, without which our spirit dies. Both individuals and societies need hope, a sense of connection to the future, if the world is to make the best decisions about values in the battles that constitute the current culture wars.

About the author

Margaret Somerville is a professor in the Faculty of Law and Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. Among her earlier books are The Ethical Canary: Science, Society and the Human Spirit (2004), and Death Talk: The Case Against Physician-Assisted Suicide (2014).


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