December 16th 2017


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY The meaning of Christmas

CANBERRA OBSERVED Parliamentary stampede tramples freedoms

EUTHANASIA Palliative care remains the true solution

FOREIGN AFFAIRS The more Zimbabwe changes, the more it stays the same

AGENDA FOR AUSTRALIA Putting the 'fair' back in the fair go for farmers

OPINION The new Reformation: How Christians found themselves on the 'wrong' side of history

PHILOSOPHY AND SOCIETY Why Marxists will not engage with opponents

ECONOMICS Kim Beazley rides in as a white knight for the TPP

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Mergers could give unions a striking profile

MUSIC Sounds like ...: A vain search for meaning

CINEMA Casablanca: Contender for the 'perfect film'

BOOK REVIEW Australia behind the scenes in WWII

BOOK REVIEW Political sparks at the 'Friendly' Games

GENDER WARS If children can decide to change their sex can they join the army or marry?

Books promotion page

OUR DAILY BREAD:
The Essential Norman Borlaug

Noel Vietmeyer

$54.00


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by Noel Vietmeyer

(Bracing Books, 2012)
Hardcover: 284 pages

ISBN: 9780578095554

Price: AUD$54.00

 

 

Book description

In the late 1960s a sudden surge in wheat and rice caught the world by surprise. Experts had proclaimed that the world could produce no more food, and that continued human population growth signified an inevitable and never-ending global famine.

Behind the unexpected leap in cereal production stood a humble Iowan who had been born half a century earlier with no prospects other than to spend his life growing the food to feed his own family. This book tells the almost miraculous series of events by which Norman Borlaug found his way from obscurity to the pinnacle of humanitarian achievement.

Today Borlaug is shaping up as one of the most important role models for world stability. Back in the 1960s when his seeds hit the international scene, the human population was 3 billion and global food production had flat-lined. Then India, to mention just one example, began planting his seeds and went from producing 12 million tonnes of wheat to over 80 million tonnes per year. Borlaug’s gift powered similar increases in almost a hundred wheat-growing nations. And his seeds are also why India and China no longer have famines, which in turn is why both have become superpowers.

 

About the author

During a long career at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, Noel Vietmeyer produced over 30 books describing innovations that can benefit Africa, Asia and Latin America. He was also a prolific freelance writer, producing some 200 articles for publications such as National Geographic, Reader’s Digest, Smithsonian, Encyclopaedia Britannica, World Book, International Wildlife and Ranger Rick.

Through his National Academy of Sciences service Vietmeyer met Norman Borlaug, the hero of our age and the main reason why the world can feed 7 billion people.


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