November 30th 2019


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY Can we put the 'care' back into aged care?

EDITORIAL Bushfires: One step forwards, one step backwards

ENVIRONMENTALISM Activists and courts give sharks the last laugh

CANBERRA OBSERVED ALP's self-examination will entice no one back

NATIONAL AFFAIRS Cardinal Pell's appeal to go to the High Court

FOREIGN AFFAIRS Deaths after Fukushima due to excessive caution

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Geopolitics, oligarchs and the Moldova miracle

ENVIRONMENT Into the unknown: Should we prepare for climate change or climate variability?

LAW AND SOCIETY Crime and punishment: Are we de-civilising?

WATER POLICY Drought relief still leaves too much water going to waste

ASIAN AFFAIRS Destination Oz: Flood of Hong Kong emigres may restart

HUMOUR MacStuttles, me ol' China

MUSIC Subliminal workhorse: An art takes the backseat

CINEMA Dr Sleep: Kubrick 'shined' from his rest

BOOK REVIEW Science and religion, with mutual respect

BOOK REVIEW A borrowed term for a socialist recipe

POETRY

LETTERS

Books promotion page

IN SEARCH OF CAPTAIN MOONLITE:
The Strange Life and Death of the Bushranger Andrew George Scott

Paul Terry

$29.95


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When a masked and cloaked bandit robbed the bank at a small gold town in 1869, he created the legend of Captain Moonlite, the gun-toting man of God who enthralled and appalled the nation for more than a decade. Real name Andrew George Scott, he is remembered as bushranger, conman, warrior and lunatic. In an 11-year life of crime, he escaped from jail, took to the road as a prison reformer and fought a pitched gun-battle that made him a household name.

Charming, articulate and intelligent, this flawed genius was also a thief, liar and chameleon whose true story has been lost to myth and misinformation. Yet when he led a pathetic band of misfits to their doom he stood tall at last and proved he was worthy to be their captain.

In Search of Captain Moonlite looks for the man behind the legend. It uses little-seen histories, a remarkable cache of rare documents and the records of his time to rewrite the story of a man who was not what he seemed.

In the end, it challenges history’s verdict and finds a truth that’s even more spectacular than the fiction.

The author, Paul Terry, is a journalist in radio, television and newspapers in New South Wales, South Australia and Tasmania. He was part of the archaeological survey of the Kelly Gang siege site in Glenrowan, Victoria, and subsequently worked as a producer on the documentary Ned Kelly Uncovered, which aired on ABC TV. He is author of The True Story of Ned Kelly’s Last Stand (2012).

Paperback, 264 pages, $29.95

ISBN 9781743315255


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