June 1st 2002


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY: Embryonic Research - Is government money funding private profit?

EDITORIAL: The Budget - time for new directions

BIOETHICS: Medical breakthrough: researchers turn skin cells into T-cells

CANBERRA: The fallacy behind the disability crackdown

Straws in the Wind: Voodoo dolls / Rodney Rude for a Logie?

HEALTH: No answer to party drugs: AMA

BANKS: Kiwibank has 150 branches in New Zealand

Rag Trade (letter)

SBS traduced (letter)

Boat people: another view (letter)

Trade hypocrisy (letter)

East Timor (letter)

Refugees? (letter)

UN Special Session on Children splits on abortion, sex education

DEMOGRAPHY: Budget ignores an ageing Australia

MEDIA: Sport - how media moguls play to win

CHILDREN'S BOOKS: 'What Should My Child Read?' by Susan Moore

BOOKS: 'Recollections of a Bleeding Heart: A portrait of Paul Keating' by Don Watson

BOOKS: 'Science, Money and Politics', by Daniel Greenberg

BOOKS: 'GERMAN BOY: A Child in War', by Wolfgang W.E. Samuel

OPINION: Dangers in cross-media monopolies

Books promotion page

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Trade hypocrisy (letter)


by Michael Nelms

News Weekly, June 1, 2002
Sir,

Pat Byrne (NW, May 18) details US trade hypocrisy with the planned massive $200 billion Farm Bill protection of its agriculture. He lists past payment levels, quoting the OECD reported average farm subsidy of 24 per cent to US farmers in 1999.

However, the current US situation may be far worse than that presented by the OECD. The New York Times (December 24, 2000) reports direct payments to US farmers as accounting for half of all the money made by farmers, with such payments having tripled since 1996.

In eight States, government assistance made up 100 per cent of overall farm income.

US farmer dependence on federal money is even higher now, in both percentage terms and real dollars, than it was at the depth of the Great Depression.

Such payments reward failure and help to oversupply the world markets in which Australian farmers must compete without subsidy. The end result is enormous damage to world agricultural prices, Australian agricultural industries and their exports.

Michael Nelms,
East Malvern, Vic




























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