April 8th 2000


  Buy Issue 2580
Qty:

Articles from this issue:

EDITORIAL: Mr Howard’s circuit-breaker

NATIONAL AFFAIRS: Fishy business: WTO’s salmon ruling NATIONAL AFFAIRS: Fishy business: WTO’s salmon ruling

AS THE WORLD TURNS

DRUGS: Random drug tests for politicians?

NATIONAL AFFAIRS: UN’s unwelcome interest in local affairs

RURAL: Anger at NP inaction over low farm prices

TELECOMMUNICATIONS: Behind the new Telstra inquiry

CANBERRA OBSERVED: Divisions exposed in ranks of Victorian, NSW Liberals

WORK: Longer working hours: unions ignore developing social crisis

LETTERS: Rural debt a legacy of “get big or get out” mentality

ENVIRONMENT: How Kyoto’s greenhouse gas cuts will hit the hip-pocket

FOREIGN AFFAIRS: Japan faces up to defence, immigration and overwork

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS: China’s spiritual vacuum

UNITED STATES: Foetal tissue sales: “dirty secret” of US abortion industry

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Democracy for all?

ECONOMICS: How globalisation puts profits before people

POPULATION: Why won’t Australian women have children?

BOOKS: 'GIVING SORROW WORDS: Women's stories of Post-Abortion Grief', by Melinda Tankard-Reist

BOOKS: 'Karl Marx', by Francis Wheen

Books promotion page

survey link

FONT SIZE:

TELECOMMUNICATIONS:
Behind the new Telstra inquiry


by News Weekly

News Weekly, April 8, 2000
The Federal Government recently announced that it would conduct a new inquiry into telecommunications services in Australia, before proceeding with the full privatisation of Telstra. The inquiry will examine the level of service provided by Telstra to rural and regional Australia.

The three-man Inquiry is headed by Tim Besley, formerly chairman of the Commonwealth Bank; Ray Braithwaite, a former National Party MP from Queensland, and Jane Bennett, a Country Woman of the Year from Tasmania, who stated that in her mind, there is still a question mark over privatisation.

Under Telstra's customer service charter, Telstra guarantees to

* keep agreed appointments in regard to either connection or repair of the telephone,

* ensure prompt connection of telephone lines, and

* prompt repair of the service (including a user's telephone and the line connecting the user to the exchange).

It is critically important that people in rural and regional Australia make written submissions to the Inquiry, with a view to highlighting the areas in which Telstra has not fulfilled the universal service obligation.

Additionally, the inquiry is expected to hear evidence about

* the high cost of telephone services in many country areas (with telephone calls often being charged at STD rates).

* the loss of jobs as Telstra reduces staff in rural areas and at customer service centres,

* the consequence of a run-down in telecommunications services, in terms of reliability.

* the implications for telecommunications of the withdrawal of other facilities (e.g. education, banking, hospitals).

The withdrawal of many private sector services require that Telstra's services, being government supplied, need to be very substantially improved just to provide the same level of amenities for Australians living in country areas.




























Join email list

Join e-newsletter list


Your cart has 0 items



Subscribe to NewsWeekly

Research Papers



Trending articles

NATIONAL AFFAIRS Cardinal rebuts commission's 'Get Pell' campaign

COVER STORY Anti-discrimination law validates Safe Schools

U.S. AFFAIRS First Brexit, now Trump: it's the economy, stupid!

INDUSTRY AND ENVIRONMENT Wikileaks reveals U.S, funding behind anti-coal campaign

COVER STORY QUT discrimination case exposes Human Rights Commission failings

FOREIGN AFFAIRS How the left whitewashed Fidel Castro

ANALYSIS What is possible to a Trump Whitehouse



News and views from around the world

19-year-old homeschooled pro-lifer wins Ontario election by landslide (Lianne Laurence)

Trump makes right choice for education secretary (National Review)

Transgender conformity (Katherine Kersten)

Sex education programs do not reduce teen pregnancy or STI rates (Philippa Taylor)

Photographer who captured Safe Schools founder harassing bystander shuts down business (Frank Chung)

Is the global middle class here to stay? (Samuel Rines)

Donald Trump could end America's new feudalism (Joel Kotkin)

It just got easier to find the perpetrators of Stalin's purges (David Filipov)

Castro's death eradicate bacillus of old-style Marxism (Gerald Warner)

Labor MP Terri Butler in QUT race case apology (Geoff Chambers)



























© Copyright NewsWeekly.com.au 2011
Last Modified:
December 2, 2016, 2:36 pm