February 4th 2012

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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY: Aid agencies' hidden abortion agenda

NATIONAL AFFAIRS: Government "hides" report of coming fuel crisis

EDITORIAL: Gillard's proposed constitutional referendum

CANBERRA OBSERVED: Labor complains that Abbott is too "negative"

SOCIETY: Even Miss Piggy has more manners than our frenzied feminists

NATIONAL SECURITY: Damned if you do and damned if you don't

FOREIGN AFFAIRS: How Islamists hijacked the Arab Revolution

UNITED STATES: The race: From WASPs to Catholics to Mormons

TAIWAN: Ma Ying-jeou wins election by reduced margin

SOCIETY: Male suicide epidemic explained

BIOETHICS: European Court's surprise ruling on human embryos

ABORTION: I have a dream for the unborn

CINEMA: Into espionage's wilderness of mirrors

BOOK REVIEW Tearing apart homosexual politics

BOOK REVIEW In the wake of the Titanic disaster

Books promotion page

Tearing apart homosexual politics

News Weekly, February 4, 2012

The Challenge of Homosexuality

by Bill Muehlenberg

Purchase STRAINED RELATIONS: The Challenge of Homosexuality

(Melbourne: Freedom Publishing)
Paperback: 266 pages
ISBN: 9780646560953
RRP: $26.95


Reviewed by Gerard Wilson


Homosexual politics has been stunningly successful, so successful that many high-profile gay activists cannot help expressing their pleasure and surprise publicly.

One result of their success is that critical comment about homosexuality and gays — any critical comment no matter how light or trivial — can result in public shaming, loss of job and destruction of one’s reputation. Gay activists have geared their control of the media so that the slightest dissent is jumped upon immediately.

It has even got to the point where aggrieved homosexuals can call on gay-favoured legislation to force people of character before the courts and special tribunals for trivial slights or comments taken out of context. Overseas jailings have occurred of people judged “homophobic”.

We are not yet at that point in Australia, but we are within an inch of it happening. All that’s needed is the right compliant judge or magistrate and a little tweaking of the present homosexual-biased legislation to make that happen.

But homosexual politics is a fraud. It is champagne trickery. In the latest phase of the campaign it has tricked a mass of Australians into thinking homosexual “marriage” is an issue of equality and rights. It does not matter how often it’s pointed out that marriage being a union of female and male there is no case of inequality or being denied one’s rights.

Regardless, homosexuals keep shouting the same message. They keep shouting because truth or logic is not at issue here; it is politics, an extremely effective politics that suppresses the truth about homosexual behaviour.

Bill Muehlenberg’s book tears apart homosexual politics. It is doing the job on homosexual politics (as one reviewer pointed out) that the Black Book of Communism has done on the horrors of communism.

From the first he targets the crucial manoeuvre of the gay activist campaign for marriage equality: shifting the debate from behaviour to identity. Muelhlenberg quotes a number of homosexual activists in support of the reality of the tactic. Here’s well-known La Trobe University academic and gay activist Dennis Altman:

“The greatest single victory of the gay movement over the past decade has been to shift the debate from behaviour to identity, thus forcing opponents into a position where they can be seen as attacking the civil rights of homosexual citizens rather than attacking specific and (as they see it) anti-social behaviour” (pages 7-8). [Emphasis is mine].

And there is this more explicit statement of tactic from an article in the homosexual press entitled “The Overhauling of Straight America”:

“In the early stages of the campaign, the public should not be shocked and repelled by the premature exposure to homosexual behaviour itself. Instead, the imagery of sex per se should be down-played, and the issue of gay rights reduced... to an abstract social question....

“Thus our campaign should not demand explicit support for homosexual practices, but should instead take anti-discrimination as its theme” (pages 6-7).

Bill Muehlenberg demonstrates that the homosexual writer of this article is right to be worried about the ordinary person’s “exposure to homosexual behaviour”. This in my view is the great benefit of his book. The demonstration is unrelenting, comprehensive and supported all along the line with sources and references, including from many leaders of gay political action.

The ordinary person will be in no doubt about what homosexual behaviour entails, its terrible risks and its outcomes of physical, emotional and mental disease. Parents will be on their knees praying that their sons and daughters escape the infection, futility and sterility of homosexual life.

It should horrify people, after learning what homosexual behaviour entails, that gay activists are agitating to have their propaganda for gay equality included in primary school lesson material.

The information, evidence and argument are all there. The book can function as an all-purpose handbook to challenge the gay activist campaign. But it must be read. I have given the briefest outline of Muehlenberg’s detailed exposition and analysis of homosexual behaviour.

Although I think the unmasking of homosexual behaviour and gay agitation the most important part of the book, there is also comprehensive discussion of some of the major gay claims, some of which have reached the status of unchallenged myth.

For example, I heard a conservative radio commentator recently say that homosexuals are born that way and they can’t do anything about it. That claim is shot down, once again by quoting some wiser homosexuals who see danger in the claim there is a “homosexual gene”.

There is also discussion about the politics of AIDS, judicial activism on behalf of homosexuals, the number of homosexuals in society (grossly exaggerated by gay activists), whether homosexuals can change (they can), homosexual adoption rights, and gays and children. But I stress once again that the book has to be read to understand and use the information.

Finally, there is a second part to the book which deals with the outrageous attempt by some gay activists to demonstrate that the Bible does not condemn homosexuality, all in defiance of centuries of consistent interpretation. There is evidently nothing gay activists won’t baulk at to advance their campaign. Success has evidently bred this level of overconfidence.

It goes without saying that Bill Muehlenberg demolishes chapter and verse their idiotic claims, claims any Christian should be embarrassed to take seriously. Indeed, the sad truth is that Christians have become so negligent in their faith that they have forgotten what the rest of dechristianised society would not even have a clue about.

Bill Meuhlenberg’s book will not only bring back the memories to forgetful Christians but expand an understanding of the relevant Bible passages.

Strained Relations: The Challenge of Homosexuality is one of the most important books I have read in the last 10 years. My copy already has ragged edges and thumb prints.

Gerard Charles Wilson is a Melbourne-based novelist and commentator on church, society and media. His memoir, Me and Pete: Recalling a Fifties Childhood, is due for publication in mid-2012. His website is at: www.gerardcharleswilson.com

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