January 27th 2001

  Buy Issue 2600

Articles from this issue:

Cover Story: What George W. Bush will mean for Australia

Editorial: Defence - "hype" and reality

Canberra Observed: The year of the elections

Victoria: Liberals in trouble - independent MP

Women: Different work patterns require a variety of policies

Straws in the Wind

Documentation: Globalism has slowed world economy

The Media

Letter: Australian Democrats leader replies

Immigration: The end of the White Australia Policy

Comment: Small business - not whingers, just forgotten

As the World Turns

Philosophy: Peter Singer - Jekyll and Hyde

Economics: Economic doubters multiply in USA

Books: 'The Gifts of the Jews: How a Tribe of Desert Nomads Changed the Way Everyone Thinks and Feels', by Thomas Cahill

Books: 'HITLER 1936-1945: Nemesis', by Ian Kershaw

Letter: Selective indignation

Letter: Major parties are different

Books promotion page

Letter: Australian Democrats leader replies

by Senator Meg Lees

News Weekly, January 27, 2001


In his November article "Economic conversion of Democrats' leader?", Colin Teese casts doubt on my credibility as an opponent of economic rationalism for two "supposed" reasons.

In the first instance, he is under the mistaken impression that my opposition to economic rationalism is the result of a "sudden conversion".

The fact is that, since the foundation of the party in 1977, the Australian Democrats have attempted to use our influence in the Senate to make successive federal governments recognise the importance of balancing their economic policies with social and environmental imperatives.

A position held with vigour by all Democrats since the inception of the party in 1977 can hardly be termed a "sudden conversion".

Most recently, we have repeatedly called for the Howard Government to spend at least some of its budget surplus on the desperately under-funded health and education sectors. We cannot see the point in the Government's obsession with retiring debt as Australia has the fourth lowest public sector debt in the OECD.

The Democrats compare this Government's obsession with debt reduction to a married couple trying to pay off their mortgage so quickly they cannot afford to feed and clothe their children.

Secondly, Mr Teese believes the Democrats have become a "de facto member of the Coalition" simply because we negotiated with the Government over the GST.

I point out to the redoubtable Mr Teese that the Democrats were also accused of being aligned with the Labor Party by Coalition supporters when the ALP held the Treasury Benches. A strong comparison can be made with the ABC which attracts criticism of bias from both sides of politics. I suggest to Mr Teese that trenchant criticism from both sides suggests independence rather than alignment.

The fact is the Democrats do not endorse or support either of the major parties. We have promised our supporters that we will examine each issue on its merits in accordance with balloted Democrat policy.

With regard to tax reform, the Democrats stayed at the tax reform negotiating table because we believed tax reform was a necessary step for Australia to take.

In doing so, and wringing significant changes from the Government, we ensured that the resultant GST would be fairer for low-income earners and better for the environment than the status quo - and certainly better than the original package proposed by the Howard Government.

I am fascinated that Mr Teese was able to base his entire article on my "supposed" ideas without consulting me once before publication. Hardly fair or assiduous on his part.

Senator Meg Lees,
Leader, Australian Democrats,
Glenelg, SA

Join email list

Join e-newsletter list

Your cart has 0 items

Subscribe to NewsWeekly

Research Papers

Trending articles

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE Memo to Shorten, Wong: LGBTIs don't want it

COVER STORY Shorten takes low road to defeat marriage plebiscite

COVER STORY Reaper mows down first child in the Low Countries

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE Kevin Andrews: defend marriage on principles

COVER STORY Bill Shorten imposes his political will on the nation

CANBERRA OBSERVED Coalition still gridlocked despite foreign success

ENVIRONMENT More pseudo science from climate

News and views from around the world

Menzies, myth and modern Australia (Jonathan Pincus)

China’s utterly disgraceful human-rights record

Japan’s cure for childlessness: a robot (Marcus Roberts)

SOGI laws: a subversive response to a non-existent problem (James Gottry)

Shakespeare, Cervantes and the romance of the real (R.V. Young)

That’s not funny: PC and humour (Anthony Sacramone)

Refugees celebrate capture of terror suspect

The Spectre of soft totalitarianism (Daniel Mahoney)

American dream more dead than you thought (Eric Levitz)

Think the world is overcrowded: These 10 maps show why you’re wrong (Max Galka)

© Copyright NewsWeekly.com.au 2011
Last Modified:
November 14, 2015, 11:18 am