March 6th 2010

  Buy Issue 2822

Articles from this issue:

SEX EDUCATION: Abstinence-only programs teach young to make wiser choices

FAMILY AND SOCIETY: What fatherlessness costs society

GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS: Greek crisis tips Europe towards double-dip recession

ECONOMIC AFFAIRS: Australian manufacturing: does it have a future?

NATIONAL SECURITY: Terrorist trial a landmark in Australian justice

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS: US arms sales affirm Taiwan's strategic role


Climate-scare game is up (letter)

CANBERRA OBSERVED: Crisis of confidence in Rudd Government

Latest quarantine fiasco (letter)

CLIMATEGATE: No recent global warming, admits Professor Jones

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Federal, state governments veto northern development

FAMILY POLICY: Voters demand equality in childcare maternity payments

INSULATION SCAM: Wheel turns full circle for Peter Garrett

ENERGY: Nuclear energy ... next generation power source

SURROGACY: Next stolen generation - who needs a mother, anyway?

AS THE WORLD TURNS: Giant mosque to overlook UK Sandhurst military academy/Controversial images withdrawn by the Met/Beware of ice cream made in China/Plummeting birthrates threaten global prosperity/Al Gore lying low

Failing schools (letter)

BOOK REVIEW: EMPIRES OF THE SILK ROAD: A History of Central Asia from the Bronze Age to the Present, by Christopher I. Beckwith

News Weekly's prescience (letter)

COVER STORY / EDITORIAL: Moment of truth for Bushfire Royal Commission

Books promotion page

Giant mosque to overlook UK Sandhurst military academy/Controversial images withdrawn by the Met/Beware of ice cream made in China/Plummeting birthrates threaten global prosperity/Al Gore lying low

News Weekly, March 6, 2010
Giant mosque planned to overlook UK's Sandhurst military academy

Generals are trying to block plans to build a mosque with two 100-foot minarets next to Sandhurst. The £3 million building would have a clear view over the military academy and is just 400 yards from its parade ground.

Senior officers oppose the project saying it could pose a security threat to cadets.

Yesterday an Army source said: "There is very real concern that if this thing gets built then soldiers could be put at risk. It is outrageous to even think that the officers of the future would have to watch their backs while they are still in training."

Hundreds of newly-commissioned Army officers take to the parade ground each year for the academy's passing out ceremony. Planning papers reveal that the massive structure would tower over local buildings.

Extract from: Dan Newling, "Defence chiefs fight plans to build £3m giant mosque that 'will loom over Sandhust'", Daily Mail (UK), February 22, 2010.


"Controversial images" withdrawn by the Met

Last month, The New York Post reported that [New York's] Metropolitan Museum of Art officials seem to have a bad case of "jihad jitters". The museum, the Post revealed, has "quietly pulled images of Mohammed from its Islamic collection and may not include them in a renovated exhibition area slated to open in 2011". Why? Museum spokesmen said that the "controversial images" were "objected to by conservative Muslims who say their religion forbids images of their holy founder".

Just recently, the Post reported, the Met decided that its Islamic Galleries will be given a new name before they reopen in 2011: "Visitors will stroll around rooms dedicated to art from 'Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Late South Asia'."

Extract from: "Dhimmitude at the Met", The New Criterion (New York), Vol. 28, February 2010.


Beware of ice cream made in China

Melamine-tainted milk products are showing up again in China. Recently, ice cream laced with the industrial chemical was discovered in Liaoning Province.

The Liaoning Province Health Bureau published the news online that high levels of melamine were found by the provincial Quality Control Department in ice cream produced by Liaoning Yachao Food Corporation. Authorities shut down manufacturing and ordered the company to recall their products. Yachao Food is under investigation, and 5.75 tons of poisoned milk formula was confiscated.

Melamine is an industrial chemical that is used as a coating in plastics and filters, and as a fire retardant. It can also be used to water down milk to increase volume and profit. ...

During the initial scandal which broke in 2008, the Chinese regime admitted that six babies died and about 300,000 others fell sick after drinking melamine-tainted milk. One year later, some companies took the tainted milk that was not destroyed and repackaged or reprocessed for healthy profits.

Extract from: Li Xi and Zhang Lina , "Chinese ice cream maker shut down for melamine contamination", Epoch Times, February 16, 2010.

Plummeting birthrates threaten global prosperity

For decades, demographers and economists have watched the world's fertility rate plunge as countries grew wealthier and more urban.

Economists are increasingly recognising that the struggles of places like Japan and Italy to extricate themselves from economic slumps that began in the 1990s result in part from extreme "birth dearths" that have shrunk labour pools, dried up consumer spending, and made businesses, staffed by older employees, more risk-averse. Decades of government efforts to reverse birth dearth have largely proved fruitless.

Yet one industrialised country resists the trend: America. True, the American fertility rate has also fallen in recent decades. But it has surged of late and now stands at population-replacement level, about 2.07 children per woman. That reality has led to projections of vigorous US economic growth in the next half-century. ...

[However], there are a few worrying trends. The massive debt that the US has piled up during the current economic crisis and the lavish new entitlement programs that Washington is considering could drive taxes much higher, depressing economic growth and potentially sending fertility rates tumbling.

And a disturbing fact embedded in our high birthrate is that 35 per cent of all American children are now born to single mothers - and the percentage is growing.

Extensive research shows that children raised in single-parent households don't do as well in a range of areas, from school to work, and any sizeable decrease in academic achievement or work-participation rates would erode the advantages of a growing working-age population.

Extract from: Steven Malanga, "Our vanishing ultimate resource", City Journal (New York), Vol. 20, No. 1, Winter 2010.


Al Gore lying low

Al Gore may be the leader of the anthropogenic global warming (AGW) movement, but he's not defending it in public, not even when it's falling apart and his new fortune is based upon it.

Mr Gore and his financial backers earned millions of dollars in start-up "green" companies and carbon trading schemes. ...

Mr Gore's financial gains were based on the contradictory and error-plagued assertion that man's release of the trace gas CO2 will fry the planet.

Once it becomes clear to everyone that the AGW theory is based on cleverly manipulated data twisted by rigged computer models controlled by several dozen IPCC politicians/scientists, we can expect that investors who lose millions by investing in these companies will eventually haul Mr Gore and the insider IPCC scientists into court.

Extract from: Rex McBride, "Al Gore is lying low - for good reason", American Thinker, February 24, 2010.

Purchase this book at the bookshop:


Join email list

Join e-newsletter list

Your cart has 0 items

Subscribe to NewsWeekly

Research Papers

Trending articles

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE Memo to Shorten, Wong: LGBTIs don't want it

COVER STORY Shorten takes low road to defeat marriage plebiscite

COVER STORY Reaper mows down first child in the Low Countries

COVER STORY Bill Shorten imposes his political will on the nation

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE Kevin Andrews: defend marriage on principles

CANBERRA OBSERVED Coalition still gridlocked despite foreign success

ENVIRONMENT More pseudo science from climate

News and views from around the world

Menzies, myth and modern Australia (Jonathan Pincus)

China’s utterly disgraceful human-rights record

Japan’s cure for childlessness: a robot (Marcus Roberts)

SOGI laws: a subversive response to a non-existent problem (James Gottry)

Shakespeare, Cervantes and the romance of the real (R.V. Young)

That’s not funny: PC and humour (Anthony Sacramone)

Refugees celebrate capture of terror suspect

The Spectre of soft totalitarianism (Daniel Mahoney)

American dream more dead than you thought (Eric Levitz)

Think the world is overcrowded: These 10 maps show why you’re wrong (Max Galka)

© Copyright 2011
Last Modified:
November 14, 2015, 11:18 am