June 7th 2008

  Buy Issue 2781

Articles from this issue:

EDITORIAL: Will money solve the problems of indigenous Australians?

COVER STORY: UK green light for creation of human-animal hybrids

CANBERRA OBSERVED: Rudd Labor Government wobbles for the first time

OVERSEAS TRADE: US farm bill buries talk of free trade in agriculture

TRADE PRACTICES ACT: Will Liberals back Labor or small business?

ECONOMIC AFFAIRS: Has financial deregulation finally been discredited?

VICTORIA: Vic. court hands gambling decision back to council

CENSORSHIP: Student union bans pro-life activities

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH: Post-abortive women: from silence to lawsuits

CULTURE: Our topsy-turvy world: on kangaroo culls and child porn

CHILDHOOD: Are violent video games harmless entertainment?

HUMAN RIGHTS: The Olympics and China's organ-harvesting shame

OPINION: Democracy in disconnect: joining the dots

AS THE WORLD TURNS: Urban environments to human scale / War on the family / How we lost the Cold War

Chickens coming home to roost (letter)

Obligation to tackle global warming (letter)

Farmers and carbon tax (letter)

Railway opportunities beckon (letter)


BOOKS: GOD'S CRUCIBLE: Islam and the Making of Modern Europe, 570-1215, by David Levering Lewis

Books promotion page

Railway opportunities beckon (letter)

by Kevin O'Neill

News Weekly, June 7, 2008

Never before in Australian history has our country had a better opportunity and a greater need for a common rail gauge and a common pool of rolling stock under Federal Government supervision.

Australia is the only nation on earth that occupies a whole continent to itself. Our flat plains are ideal railway country, and we should have the best rail service in the developed world.

In 1945, near the end of World War II, Ben Chifley, a successful Labor Prime Minister and Treasurer, commissioned Sir Harold Clapp KBE, the wartime director of land transport, to provide a report on standardisation of the Australian rail network.

Clapp reported in March 1945 with the most significant document on the Australian rail network ever produced in Australia.

In 1948, the Chifley Labor Government was succeeded by the Menzies-led Liberal-Country Party Government.

The Menzies Government took the view that rail standardisation was "a state matter", and Chifley's proposal lapsed.

In the 1950s and '60s, the energetic and far-seeing William Wentworth MP was successful in providing a standard-gauge rail-link to all mainland state capitals.

Because Australia is the most urbanised nation on earth, the greatest proportion of the Australian nation was now linked by standard gauge. However, the wealth and food-producing regions of Australia were left with three different rail gauges and several different administering authorities.

Today, Australia has wall-to-wall Labor governments, both state and federal, with no room for the blame game.

The Commonwealth government debt has long been paid off, and the federal Treasury is flush with revenue as never before in Australian history.

There is a one-in-a-hundred years opportunity for the Federal Government to provide the nation with a rail network that will stimulate industry both urban and rural, and give a huge lift to the defence profile of Australia.

Kevin O'Neill,
Progressive Rail Association,
Tocumwal, NSW

Join email list

Join e-newsletter list

Your cart has 0 items

Subscribe to NewsWeekly

Research Papers

Trending articles

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE Memo to Shorten, Wong: LGBTIs don't want it

COVER STORY Shorten takes low road to defeat marriage plebiscite

COVER STORY Reaper mows down first child in the Low Countries

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE Kevin Andrews: defend marriage on principles

CANBERRA OBSERVED Coalition still gridlocked despite foreign success

ENVIRONMENT More pseudo science from climate

COVER STORY Bill Shorten imposes his political will on the nation

News and views from around the world

Menzies, myth and modern Australia (Jonathan Pincus)

China’s utterly disgraceful human-rights record

Japan’s cure for childlessness: a robot (Marcus Roberts)

SOGI laws: a subversive response to a non-existent problem (James Gottry)

Shakespeare, Cervantes and the romance of the real (R.V. Young)

That’s not funny: PC and humour (Anthony Sacramone)

Refugees celebrate capture of terror suspect

The Spectre of soft totalitarianism (Daniel Mahoney)

American dream more dead than you thought (Eric Levitz)

Think the world is overcrowded: These 10 maps show why you’re wrong (Max Galka)

© Copyright NewsWeekly.com.au 2011
Last Modified:
November 14, 2015, 11:18 am