March 31st 2007


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY: Red Star over East Timor

EDITORIAL: Melbourne Cup field in Timor's Presidential election

CANBERRA OBSERVED: Time running out for John Howard?

FINANCE: Concerns over US company behind Qantas takeover

ECONOMIC AFFAIRS: Australia's foreign debt - myth and reality

WESTERN AUSTRALIA: Brian Burke's shadow government

STRAWS IN THE WIND: Why must the show go on? / Another wake for absent friends / Reluctance to condemn Mugabe / Musical chairs / More heat than light

INTELLIGENCE CORNER

DRUG POLICY: Sweden's success in combating drug use

UNITED NATIONS: Dilemma for pro-abortion feminists

OPINION: The narcotic of narcissism

AS THE WORLD TURNS: Mothers in the military

CINEMA: Where Hollywood fears to tread - Mel Gibson's 'Apocalypto'

THE ARGUS: Life & Death of a Newspaper

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AS THE WORLD TURNS:
Mothers in the military


by Allan Carlson

News Weekly, March 31, 2007
AS THE WORLD TURNS: Mothers in the military

Why does the United States send the mothers of infants and toddlers off to fight a foreign war, asks Allan Carlson.

Why does the United States send the mothers of infants and toddlers off to fight a foreign war?

Make no mistake: We are the exception here. In the whole sweep of human history, no other nation - not Soviet Russia, nor the Iraqi Baathists, nor the egalitarian Scandinavians - has intentionally placed young mothers in harm's way such as American military planners have done in Iraq.

The strong and normal human instinct is to protect infants, toddlers and their mothers. Indeed, their well-being and security form the central purposes of every healthy nation. From the smallest tribe to the greatest empire, the human rule has been that all others must sacrifice, and even die, to protect the mothers of the young, for they are a people's future.

...The costs of this great social experiment have yet to be counted. We can safely assume, though, that the children left behind will pay the largest price. Mothers play unique, irreplaceable roles for newborns and toddlers.

Social science research shows that young children effectively abandoned by their mothers for lengthy periods are much more likely to suffer emotional and mental disorders, more likely in later life to be in trouble with the law and abuse drugs, and less likely to succeed in school than children with their mothers available.

Grandparents, day-care centers and even fathers are second-best substitutes.

- extract from Allan Carlson, "Mothers at war: The American way?," WorldNetDaily, April 11, 2003. Full article at URL: http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?article_id=31981




























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