August 4th 2007


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Articles from this issue:

EDITORIAL: Solving the housing crisis

NATIONAL SECURITY: The lessons of the Dr Haneef case

CANBERRA AFFAIRS: Will Liberals dump Howard before election?

ECONOMIC AFFAIRS: Call for industry policy debate

PORNOGRAPHY: Canberra drags its feet over internet porn

FAMILY: Group marriage on the way

VICTORIA: No more abortions, please

STRAWS IN THE WIND: Bring back King Canute / The entertainers / Broadcaster's bias / Regime changes in Turkey and Pakistan?

SPECIAL FEATURE: Postmodern science - a contradiction in terms

VIETNAM: Economic tiger, political laggard

GLOBAL WARMING: Hosting a hog roast to promote vegetarianism

OBITUARY: A born leader and exemplary Christian - Peter Keogh (1931-2007)

Tough anti-terror laws needed (letter)

Collective bargaining hypocrisy (letter)

Rudd on grocery and housing prices (letter)

Young couples without homes (letter)

First home unaffordable (letter)

Young people deprived by technology (letter)

Film's Christian theme? (letter)

BOOKS: STRUGGLE AND ACHIEVEMENT, by Hal G.P. Colebatch

BOOKS: ELLA: Princess, Saint and Martyr, by Christopher Warwick

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Tough anti-terror laws needed (letter)


by Greg O'Regan

News Weekly, August 4, 2007
Sir,

Despite the headlines, I suggest that public opinion is not with those protesting over detaining a suspected or active terrorist.

For all the wailing from law societies, civil libertarians and do-gooders, most people want a peaceful society with laws that are severe enough to protect them from terrorism. Judging from the cases of suspected terrorism so far, our current laws appear to be too lenient and unsuited to the state of conflict between radical Islamists and the West (namely us).

To continue to apply to terrorists the kind of laws that we use for routine criminal suspects is plainly unsound and will cost many lives as the authorities will trail at a disadvantage. This is because they will be reacting to terror rather than proactively seeking to prevent it.

The media and strident critics forget that the culprits in this conflict are the terrorists and their supporters, not our protective agencies. It is the aggressive zeal of terrorism that has widened its reach globally and its disguises are many. To combat terrorism and reduce the chance of innocent Australians being randomly killed, our protective agencies need and should be given extraordinary powers in every aspect of their work.

Greg O'Regan,
Farrer, ACT




























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