October 28th 2006


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Articles from this issue:

CANBERRA OBSERVED: Media laws: dramatic change or maintaining status quo?

EDITORIAL: Water trading: what it's all about

TECHNOLOGY: Beijing bid to steal Australia's secret military technology

TRADE: The fate of Australian agriculture under globalisation

FOREIGN AFFAIRS: East Timor: the Cubans are coming

STRAWS IN THE WIND: Kofi and friends, Obituary wars, Skills shortages and literacy shortages

FOREIGN AFFAIRS: New strategy needed for global security, prosperity

SPECIAL FEATURE: What globalism is doing to 'Middle America'

EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH: Embryonic stem cells: fraud and fairy tales

ENERGY: Hot rocks: is geothermal heat the way ahead for power generation?

FOREIGN AFFAIRS: North Korean nuclear test: implications for Middle East

FOREIGN AFFAIRS: Empowering women: Israeli bid to curb Islamist extremism

Kyoto protocol (letter)

Queensland election (letter)

Margaret Whitlam (letter)

BOOKS: THE PARTNERSHIP, by Greg Sheridan

BOOKS: THE DEATH OF ADAM, by Marilynne Robinson

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Kyoto protocol (letter)


by J. Mangan

News Weekly, October 28, 2006

Sir,

In relation to recent demands by the ALP Environment spokesman, Anthony Albanese, that Australia sign the Kyoto protocol to curb greenhouse gases, it should be said that many of the signatories will not reach the target of cutting greenhouse gas emissions to 1991 levels.

Among the worst off is Canada, the current president of U.N. climate change talks, which this year became the first country to announce it would not meet its Kyoto target of a 6 percent emissions cut on average over the years 2008-2012. Canada's emissions have ballooned by 29 percent instead.

UN forecasts show Japan's emissions will grow by 6 percent, instead of shrink by the same rate as mandated by the treaty.

Spain and Britain will meet their targets, because they have switched from coal to natural gas power generation. Other EU countries will only reach the targets through carbon trading credits.

Developing countries are not included, so China and India, for example, are not restricted in the growth of greenhouse gas emissions.

Australia has done the right thing by refusing to sign the Kyoto protocol.

J. Mangan,
Christies Beach, SA




























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