January 21st 2006

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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY: B.A. Santamaria: the making of a political warrior

EDITORIAL: Unbalanced economy: the problems ahead

CANBERRA OBSERVED: The Coalition - a rocky road ahead for 2006

NATIONAL SECURITY: How Australia should fight terrorism

POLITICAL ISSUES: Muddled thinking in green politics and ecology

MEDICAL SCIENCE: D-I-Y abortion drug RU-486 endangers women's lives

CULTURE AND CIVILISATION: Western elites lack moral courage

The struggle against forgetting (letter)

Living standards and the labour market (letter)

A slogan for RU-486? (letter)

CINEMA: Paradise Now - Portrait of deranged killer as hero

CINEMA: C.S. Lewis tale brilliantly translated to big screen

BOOKS: JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH: His Life, His Politics, His Economics, by Richard Parker

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The struggle against forgetting (letter)

by Desmond J. McDonnell

News Weekly, January 21, 2006

Bill Muehlenberg has written a fine Christmas think piece, "What are we fighting for?" (News Weekly, December 17, 2005).

Muehlenberg and T.S. Eliot, whom he quotes, both see the battle as essentially over culture.

T.S. Eliot is quoted as saying, "If Christianity goes, the whole of our culture goes", and will be followed by "many centuries of barbarism".

George Orwell inverted the numerals of the year 1948 for the title of his book Nineteen Eighty-Four in which, as in his Animal Farm (where he called it "Animalism"), he shows how the necessarily lying new barbarism of communism necessarily seeks to "dumb down" our thinking, wipe out our memories and rewrite the past which would expose and condemn their lying.

For memory and history are vitally important. But history makes people uncomfortable and they tend to prefer to forget its often terrible witness to human sin.

Is communism dead? Well, where in the "former communist" countries are to be found any formal apologies, memorial museums or sample gulags for tourist inspections?

Meanwhile, where are our religious schools' and universities' church history programs and museums showing us the grandeur and the glory of Christ and His Church and the lives of His great saints?

Where are our anti-bigotry programs and museums exposing the long-peddled lies on such subjects as the Gospels being written late, St Peter's tomb not being in Rome, the Crusades, the Inquisition, the Galileo "martyrdom" and so forth?

After two centuries of research, the evidence against these falsehoods has been sifted and sorted and is mountainous. But what country is there to be found in the world in which formal recognition of Jesus Christ as our supreme Teacher and Guide is even thought of?

Instead, as Muehlenberg has shown in gruesome detail in his book review - also in News Weekly, December 17, 2005 - our culture is in the process of being "pornified".

For fantasy remains easier than reality, and men keep wanting to forget.

I understand that in some countries "Holocaust denial" has become a jailable offence.

I, for one, have no difficulty believing that the Nazis would plan and carry out such a thing. It fits with atheistic evolutionary ideology. Moreover, the communists have admitted to doing as much and over a much longer time.

Desmond J. McDonnell,
Goulburn, NSW

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