January 8th 2005

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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY: DEMOCRACY: How free societies perish

EDITORIAL: New direction in Aboriginal policy

NATIONAL AFFAIRS: The bubble economy - can it last?

AGRICULTURE: Getting rural policy on track

LIVESTOCK: 18,100 livestock farmers gone

OPINION: Post-Latham: now for a real Third Way

AUSTRALIA'S CONSTITUTION: The Governor-General is our head of state

LIFE AND FAITH: The quest for meaning in James McAuley

STRAWS IN THE WIND: La Ronde / A quarry and a hard place / National politics / Maritime terrorism

OBITUARY: Vale Pat Edward Conway (1932-2004)

EUTHANASIA: Continent Death: Euthanasia in Europe

Left's educational legacy (letter)

BOOKS: HUMAN DIGNITY IN THE BIOTECH CENTURY: A Christian vision for public policy

BOOKS: TREASON: Liberal Treachery from the Cold War to the War on Terrorism, by Ann Coulter

Books promotion page

Vale Pat Edward Conway (1932-2004)

by Victor Sirl

News Weekly, January 8, 2005
September 15, 1932 - December 4, 2004

Pat Edward Conway - one of the Queensland National Civic Council's great personalities - commenced work for the NCC in Brisbane in July 1974. It was there, as his family readily agrees, that he found his niche.

In his typical blunt style, Pat used to say that the best day of his life was when he left school. His first job was as a telegram delivery-boy for the Postmaster-General's department, resulting in his working briefly near Longreach. Following this, he worked for Olympic Tyres in Brisbane.

Although he never married, he fully occupied his spare time. In earlier days he had some exciting mishaps fishing and boating, but achieved greater success later when he became Queensland's Open Champion for old-time new-vogue ballroom dancing. In later life, "Uncle Pat" was much loved at family events where his nieces and nephews will now "miss his smiling face".

Pat was an office-bearer for the NCC from 1974 until seven years ago. Even then, he had no intention of giving up work. He continued to work a full week until only recently when illness made it impossible for him to continue.

One of Pat's earliest duties was to organise fund-raising functions - a job that he continued to do with great zest until his recent illness.

Pat Conway was a true and dedicated believer and over the years was a rock upon which the Queensland state office was always safely anchored. He was a "quiet achiever" who never sought personal glory.

His close friend, and Queensland state president for 40 years, Brian Mullins, relied on Pat for the smooth running of the office and valued his wise advice and absolute loyalty. Appropriately, Pat's picture has been placed on the wall in the Queensland office alongside Brian's and B.A. Santamaria's.

Pat possessed, in greater abundance than most, the virtues of loyalty, modesty and honesty. These were combined with strongly held moral convictions and his devotion to the Catholic faith. He will be deeply missed by his family and his many friends in the NCC.

Pat is now at rest with his mother, father and brother Peter, buried in the Nudgee cemetary, only a short distance from Forrest Street where he lived with his family for most of his life.

To Pat's brothers Michael, Kerry, Kevin, his sister Mary, her husband Dennis Talbot and all his extended family, the staff and office-bearers of the NCC offer their heartfelt sympathies.

  • Victor Sirl

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