November 30th 2019


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY Can we put the 'care' back into aged care?

EDITORIAL Bushfires: One step forwards, one step backwards

ENVIRONMENTALISM Activists and courts give sharks the last laugh

CANBERRA OBSERVED ALP's self-examination will entice no one back

NATIONAL AFFAIRS Cardinal Pell's appeal to go to the High Court

FOREIGN AFFAIRS Deaths after Fukushima due to excessive caution

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Geopolitics, oligarchs and the Moldova miracle

ENVIRONMENT Into the unknown: Should we prepare for climate change or climate variability?

LAW AND SOCIETY Crime and punishment: Are we de-civilising?

WATER POLICY Drought relief still leaves too much water going to waste

ASIAN AFFAIRS Destination Oz: Flood of Hong Kong emigres may restart

HUMOUR MacStuttles, me ol' China

MUSIC Subliminal workhorse: An art takes the backseat

CINEMA Dr Sleep: Kubrick 'shined' from his rest

BOOK REVIEW Science and religion, with mutual respect

BOOK REVIEW A borrowed term for a socialist recipe

POETRY

LETTERS

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News Weekly current issue featured articles:

COVER STORY Can we put the 'care' back into aged care?
The Interim Report of the Aged Care Royal Commission, which was released at the end of October, is both an indictment of our society’s treatment of the aged and infirm, and a call to arms to fix the deep deficiencies revealed in the course of the royal commission’s investigations.
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EDITORIAL Bushfires: One step forwards, one step backwards
Media portrayal of the NSW and Queensland bushfires as “catastrophic” erroneously implies that they are unprecedented, whereas droughts make bushfires inevi­table in Australia’s highly flammable eucalypt forests.
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ENVIRONMENTALISM Activists and courts give sharks the last laugh
 
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CANBERRA OBSERVED ALP's self-examination will entice no one back
At the last federal election, the Australian Labor Party took to the people the most radical policy platform since Gough Whitlam’s in 1972 amid the near-certainty of its frontbenchers that they would be in government to implement those policies.
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NATIONAL AFFAIRS Cardinal Pell's appeal to go to the High Court
The High Court of Australia has granted leave for Cardinal George Pell to appeal against his conviction on sex-abuse charges.
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FOREIGN AFFAIRS Deaths after Fukushima due to excessive caution
A newly released study of deaths in the aftermath of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has called for precaution with regard to the much-touted Precautionary Principle.
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INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Geopolitics, oligarchs and the Moldova miracle
Little Moldova does not receive much media attention in the English-speaking world. It is fair to say that a large number of Australians, Britons and Americans have probably never heard of this sliver of a country.
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ENVIRONMENT Into the unknown: Should we prepare for climate change or climate variability?
How well do we actually understand climate? Is climate data indicative of climate change or are we dealing rather with climate variability? To clarify that question, we will review an example of climate data – the summer mean temperature anomaly for Australia. Then will follow a brief theoretical analysis of climate risk and decision-making. We will finish with a practical analysis of climate influences and the climate system.
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LAW AND SOCIETY Crime and punishment: Are we de-civilising?
What does it mean to say that a people is “civilised”? It is rude today to consider any nation or ethnic group anything other than civilised, and yet for the term to have any real meaning it must be possible to be uncivilised. In common usage it is taken to mean mannerly, non-violent, and of an advanced level (or, not to be rude, any level) of technology; and it is indeed true that all cultures define the acceptable in manners and personal vio­lence, and employ technologies.
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WATER POLICY Drought relief still leaves too much water going to waste
It seems at last that it has been recognised that there are two droughts impacting the eastern states at the same time – both resulting from an extended low-rainfall pattern over several years.
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ASIAN AFFAIRS Destination Oz: Flood of Hong Kong emigres may restart
In 1997, Britain returned Hong Kong to China. Hong Kong, ceded to Britain by China in 1842, later along with the Kowloon Peninsula and the New Territories, was to be British Territory “in perpetuity”.
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HUMOUR MacStuttles, me ol' China
Crikey, right now Chinamen and Chinese sheilas are all over Australia, swanning around with Aldi bags purchasing post grads, pasturage, ports and parliaments.
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MUSIC Subliminal workhorse: An art takes the backseat
Film has always seemed to this writer to be a highly manipulative art form or entertainment. But why? After all, all forms of artifice are designed to manipulate the audience to some extent; that is the very nature of the endeavour.
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CINEMA Dr Sleep: Kubrick 'shined' from his rest
Doctor Sleep is the sequel to 1980’s horror classic, The Shining. It cleverly draws on Stanley Kubrick’s masterful, if loose, adaptation of Stephen King’s novel of the same name to tell a different sort of story and is itself based on King’s own 2013 sequel to the novel.
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BOOK REVIEW Science and religion, with mutual respect
The first chapter describes Trasancos’ journey from undergraduate biology student to chemistry teacher to highly cited research scientist, publishing in highly prestigious journals in chemistry, and earning a doctorate in chemistry from Penn State University in the United States. She completed some very impressive work on artificial photosynthesis and, if one were to calculate the “impact” of her scientific work, it would be at least five times higher than mine.
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BOOK REVIEW A borrowed term for a socialist recipe
Of course, Plato first made the point nearly 2,500 years ago, but we are slow learners. We consistently suppose that we can, out of our own resources, create some sort of heaven on earth – a case of trying to “immanentise the eschaton”, in the memorable phrase of Eric Voegelin.
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POETRY
A Cooking Poem
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LETTERS
Bill James (News Weekly, November 2, 2019), in his reply to my letter (News Weekly, October 19, 2019) tells us that “life expectancy in China rose from 35-40 years in 1949 to 65.5 years in 1980”. He also tells us that “facts remain facts”.
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All you need to know about
the wider impact of transgenderism on society.
TRANSGENDER: one shade of grey, 353pp, $39.99


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June 6, 2019, 1:15 pm