January 25th 2020


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Articles from this issue:

COVER STORY Wildfires: Lessons from the past not yet learnt

EDITORIAL America 'resets' foreign policy on China and Russia

CANBERRA OBSERVED After the fires, we still need an economy and to power it

GENDER POLITICS In trans Newspeak, parental consent is a 'hurdle'

REFLECTION Conjugal honour: Love of husband and wife joined together in pure intimacy

LIFE ISSUES Pro-lifers punished for exposing baby harvesting

LAW AND SOCIETY Cardinal Pell and the Appeal Court judges

LITERATURE AND SOCIETY The poetry of Distributism

AUSTRALIAN HISTORY Botany Bay: Always more than a dumping ground

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Finally getting Brexit done

HUMOUR The MacStuttles probe

MUSIC From retch to wretched

CINEMA Three times the bravura: 1917, The Gentlemen, Shaun the Sheep: Farmageddon

BOOK REVIEW The contradictions of the dominant ideology

BOOK REVIEW Novel celebrates inventor of literary fairytales

POETRY

LETTERS

HUMAN RIGHTS A Magnitsky-style law for Australia?

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News Weekly current issue featured articles:

COVER STORY Wildfires: Lessons from the past not yet learnt
Not surprisingly, most of the media have blamed the terrible wildfires that have caused massive damage in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales on the Morrison Government’s inaction on climate change.
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EDITORIAL America 'resets' foreign policy on China and Russia
Behind the endless media turmoil over President Trump, there is strong bipartisan support in Washington for a foreign policy “reset” to handle Beijing’s expansionary ambitions and Russia’s ascendancy aspirations over parts of its old Soviet empire in Eastern Europe, Africa and Latin America.
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CANBERRA OBSERVED After the fires, we still need an economy and to power it
Undoubtedly the fires of the summer of 2020 have altered the political conversation in Australia about climate change, but to what extent and what will be the actual response?
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GENDER POLITICS In trans Newspeak, parental consent is a 'hurdle'
Across the Western world the adoption of transgender laws has progressed at an astounding pace over the last few years. Transgender marriage laws (usually referred to as same-sex marriage laws), anti-discrimination laws, birth and marriage registration laws, have given not only legal recognition but protected status to self-chosen gender identity over biological sexual identity: that is, heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual.
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REFLECTION Conjugal honour: Love of husband and wife joined together in pure intimacy
Contemporary society seems to have lost the understanding and the meaning of conjugal honour or even the will or knowledge of how to protect conjugal honour.
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LIFE ISSUES Pro-lifers punished for exposing baby harvesting
 
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LAW AND SOCIETY Cardinal Pell and the Appeal Court judges
One hope remains for George Cardinal Pell: that the High Court will overturn his guilty verdict. The case should be heard fairly early this year.
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LITERATURE AND SOCIETY The poetry of Distributism
Is it possible to speak of a social and economic philosophy as “poetic”? The name G.K. Chesterton gave to his social philosophy – “Distributism”, which he admitted was “an awkward but accurate name”[1] – conveys its essential meaning of widely distributed property and ownership (as against their concentration in a few hands), but its origins can be seen as poetic more than philosophical.
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AUSTRALIAN HISTORY Botany Bay: Always more than a dumping ground
It is almost universally assumed that the settlement at Botany Bay was simply a dumping ground for England’s convicted felons. This is not true. Captain Arthur Phillip, the first Governor of New South Wales, said: “There can be no slavery in a free land and consequently no slaves.” Botany Bay would be governed by civil law.
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INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Finally getting Brexit done
Boris Johnson’s handsome win in the British election was hardly surprising, really, given the policy Jeremy Corbyn’s Labor put to the electorate.
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HUMOUR The MacStuttles probe
Mr Patrick MacStuttles, head of activist climate stable organisation Creation Celebration, is facing impeachment for climate emergency denial.
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MUSIC From retch to wretched
Now I freely admit that when it comes to Chinese opera I know absolutely nothing. My ignorance is total. So, when I say that the sound of screaming cats drowning in molten lead is like angelic, harmonious choirs when compared with Chinese opera I am, of course, being culturally insensitive and a bit of a barbarian – actually, make that a lot of a barbarian.
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CINEMA Three times the bravura: 1917, The Gentlemen, Shaun the Sheep: Farmageddon
1917 is Sam Mendes’ – of American Beauty and Skyfall fame – critically acclaimed war epic shot in long takes and cut together in such a way that it appears as one continuous shot.
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BOOK REVIEW The contradictions of the dominant ideology
The title of the book is rather odd. I would have thought it almost impossible to shock a modern liberal-minded person, since their whole agenda is directed towards “shocking” the conservative mind-set. “Liberal Shock”, there-fore, is an oxymoron.
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BOOK REVIEW Novel celebrates inventor of literary fairytales
While fairytales are generally associated with the Grimm brothers, early 19th-century German writers, scholars now argue that D’Aulnoy invented the genre, which became extremely popular in the 1690s. She employed what was then a standard means of promoting her works, namely a literary salon. At these gatherings Marie Catherine read excerpts of drafts of her forthcoming works, to gauge the reactions of attendees. Emerging writers were also given the opportunity to present their works at such salons to gain interest from potential readers.
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POETRY
Down There in the Valley
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LETTERS
In the prosecution of George Cardinal Pell, the long process of appeal is now being subject to further prolonged delays. Even our more elite judicial officers are fallible and on some occasions make errors of judgement. To admit to such errors is what distinguishes great judicial offi-cers from mediocre ones.
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HUMAN RIGHTS A Magnitsky-style law for Australia?
Sergei Magnitsky was a tax accountant who was murdered in a Russian prison in 2009, having previously been refused medical treatment for severe illnesses. He had been detained after investigating a $US230 million ($A336 million) fraud involving Russian tax officials.
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All you need to know about
the wider impact of transgenderism on society.
TRANSGENDER: one shade of grey, 353pp, $39.99


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COVER STORY Wildfires: Lessons from the past not yet learnt

HUMAN RIGHTS A Magnitsky-style law for Australia?

GENDER POLITICS In trans Newspeak, parental consent is a 'hurdle'

EDITORIAL America 'resets' foreign policy on China and Russia

CANBERRA OBSERVED After the fires, we still need an economy and to power it

LAW AND SOCIETY Cardinal Pell and the Appeal Court judges

HUMOUR The MacStuttles probe



























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Last Modified:
June 6, 2019, 1:15 pm